Thailand Is A Leading Nation For Women In Business

37 percent of Thailand’s leadership roles are held by women, according to data from consultancy Grant Thornton.

Although that’s obviously not yet at a level of complete gender parity, it’s still an impressive figure in comparison to the global average of just 24 percent.

Just pipping Thailand to the post as having the greatest proportion of women in leadership roles in Asia Pacific is the Philippines at 39 percent. Indonesia follows Thailand at 36 percent, reports The Nation

On a global level, Russia leads with 45 percent of its executive roles filled by women while Japan flails at the back with a paltry 7 percent.

“In Thailand, we’ve consistently held a leading position among the world’s best-performing nations when it comes to the occupation of senior business roles by women,” commented Sumalee Chokdeeanant of Grant Thornton.

“A well-established culture of women receiving further education and advocacy of women in business has spurred change.”

At the next level down from leadership, in senior management roles, women are not quite as well represented. 23 percent of senior manager roles in the Asia-Pacific region are held by women, while in Thailand, 21 percent of businesses have no women at all in their senior management teams.

Comparatively, Russia has no businesses without female senior management, while, predictably, 73 percent of Japan’s businesses have no women senior managers.

Of course, while there’s still work to be done in the quest for gender equality, Thailand can take heart in its position as a leading nation in Asia Pacific for women in top corporate roles. As more women in the public eye take on important business roles, examples are set for younger generations – for instance, two members of the current Cabinet are female while six important governmental departments are run by women.

In the private sector, female leaders are behind the scenes of shopping mall behemoths Siam Paragon and EM District.

What more can be done to advance gender equality in Thailand?

 

Featured image is by drburtoni and used under a Creative Commons licence

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