Welcome to the WOS Sukhumvit Soi Guides.

Want to find the best nightlife and restaurants in downtown BKK? Wondering if a certain soi is the right place to stay on your vacation?

Wonder no more!

Our soi guides bring you the very best (and worst) of Sukhumvit.

Asok Sois

  • Sukhumvit Soi 12 — Say hello to Bangkok’s most dangerous hammock.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 14 — Home to expat favourite, Hemingway’s, one of Sukhumvit’s best restaurants.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 15 — A ‘hotel soi’, thanks to the many accommodation options that line its streets.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 16 — The forgotten soi of Sukhumvit; just off Thanon Ratchadaphisek.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 17 — Short street just before the approach to the Terminal 21 shopping mall.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 18 — Soi 18 marks the point where the sois of Asok merge into the Phrom Phong neighbourhood.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 19 — One of Asok’s most buzzing streets; next to Terminal 21.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 21 — One of the major arteries of central Bangkok and a huge road. Behold the traffic jams.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 23 — Home to the infamous Soi Cowboy and more than its fair share of massage parlours.

Ekkamai Sois

  • Sukhumvit Soi 40 — Long road that stretches down to Rama IV and runs alongside the Khlong Toei canal.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 42 — Right next door to the Gateway Ekkamai shopping mall is Sukhumvit Soi 42.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 61 — Also known as Setthabut Alley, Sukhumvit Soi 61 lies next door to the behemoth of Soi Ekkamai.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 63 — The major thoroughfare in Ekkamai is Sukhumvit Soi 63.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 65 — Very popular neighbourhood for expats and young, wealthy Thais

Nana Sois

  • Sukhumvit Soi 1 — Sukhumvit Soi 1 lies in between the expressway and the mighty Bumrungrad International Hospital.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 2 — Quiet yet plentiful street that provides some relief from the sleazy hubbub of Soi 4.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 3 — Also known as Soi Nana, Sukhumvit Soi 3 is one of the main thoroughfares of the Nana neighbourhood.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 3/1 — The heart of the Arab district — unimaginatively called ‘Soi Arab’.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 4 — One of Bangkok’s less family friendly streets, known for its sleazy bar scene.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 5 — A quieter street than its neighbours, Sukhumvit Soi 5 is home to a few hotels, as well as the famous Gulliver’s Tavern.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 6 — Reasonably short street that connects to Soi 4 via the Chai Saman Alley at its end

  • Sukhumvit Soi 7 — Another small and reasonably quiet soi in Nana that has a few bars and hotels lining the streets.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 8 — Soi 8 is one of the most underrated of Sukhumvit’s many streets.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 9 — Handily located right next door to the BTS station and Sukhumvit Soi 11.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 10 — Sat alongside the peaceful, private park, Chuvit Garden, and home to a number of hotels.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 11 — A totally different beast in the daytime, Soi 11 is one of Sukhumvit’s thriving nightlife spots.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 13 — One of the major thoroughfares of the Nana neighbourhood.

Phrom Phong Sois

  • Sukhumvit Soi 22 — Long street that stretches from Sukhumvit almost all the way down to Rama IV.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 24 — Right next door to the Emporium shopping mall and BTS Phrom Phong.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 25 — Next door to the Jasmine City Building, a short soi before the Asok neighbourhood morphs into Phrom Phong.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 26 — A handful of hidden gems in the form of restaurants, shops and cafes.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 27 — Short soi between the neighbourhoods of Asok and Phrom Phong.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 28 — Marks where the Phrom Phong neighbourhood fades into Thong Lor.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 29 — Connecting to both Soi 27 and Soi 31, Sukhumvit Soi 29 is a short alleyway in Phrom Phong

  • Sukhumvit Soi 30 — Another short soi in the Phrom Phong neighbourhood.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 31 — Some of the best restaurants in the city can be found here, as well as a handful of cute, independent coffee shops.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 33 — Where girly bars rub shoulders with luxury condos.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 33/1 — Home to a couple of British pubs and a handful of Japanese restaurants.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 35 — The road that runs next door to EmQuartier shopping mall.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 37 — Positioned directly adjacent to Phrom Phong BTS station and between EmQuartier and the huge Soi 39.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 39 — Stretches all the way from Sukhumvit Road to join up with Soi Sawadee and across the Khlong Saen Saep to Phetchaburi.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 41 — Short soi next to Tops Market and the Miracle Mall on Sukhumvit Road.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 43 — Also known as Soi Saeng Mukda, this is a short soi at the start of Thonglor neighbourhood.

Thonglor Sois

  • Sukhumvit Soi 34 — Also known as Suphang Alley, Sukhumvit Soi 34 is a long and winding soi at the start of the Thonglor neighbourhood.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 36 — Right next to Thonglor BTS station; a long street stretching from Sukhumvit down to Rama IV road.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 38 — Now the night market has gone, what’s left on Soi 38?

  • Sukhumvit Soi 45 — Short soi but with plenty of character, this marks the true start of the Thonglor neighbourhood.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 47 — Major highlight here is the Rain Hill shopping centre, on the corner with Sukhumvit Road

  • Sukhumvit Soi 49 — Restaurants abound here, as well as apartment buildings and a few hotels.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 51 — In the heart of Thonglor, Sukhumvit Soi 51 is a short soi that eventually bends around to meet its longer neighbour, Soi 49.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 53 — While not quite as wild and crazy as its neighbour 55, there’s still plenty going on here.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 55 — Otherwise known as Soi Thonglor, this is an absolute treasure trove and the heart of Thonglor’s nightlife.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 57 — Quieter down here than some of the larger and rowdier parts of Thonglor.

  • Sukhumvit Soi 59 — A short soi with a number of condo and apartment buildings, as well as a few restaurants and hotels.

If we’ve missed any numbers between 1-65, there’s probably a good reason. Several sois are no more than abandoned alleys populated by street dogs and piles of cement.

Not what you’d call a destination!

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